The Diaspora and Jewish customs

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In history, we recently finished studying the Crusades, and for the past week, we’ve been learning about the Diaspora. It’s been interesting. We did map work to indicate the countries to which the Jews were scattered after leaving Jerusalem. I love map work, as it really helps to solidify geography.

As a side note, we learned more about King Herod (of the Bible). I really appreciate when it becomes obvious that our general history texts and Biblical texts coincide.

We talked about some of the Jewish holidays like Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur that we see on calendars but never really knew exactly what they were. We discussed Yiddish / Hebrew expressions that are often used in Jewish communities, many of which we were already familiar. Some of our favorites: Shabbat Shalom, Mazel Tov, gesundheit, bat / bar mitzvah

Of course we discussed the Passover, and the girls had some interesting thoughts regarding God’s judgment. We learned about some traditions in the Passover meal, and we made two kinds of Jewish charoset (representation of the mortar between the bricks that the Jews had to work with in Egypt.) This little “snack” is very simple but VERY tasty!

One Reply to “The Diaspora and Jewish customs”

  1. What a wonderful study! I love the way you and the girls explore different cultures from the history, language, food and customs. These types of studies really give an introduction to cultures that can really grow an appreciation for them. Thanks for sharing this with our girls. I learned a couple of things too.

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